Affordable Insurance For Legendary Legacy Trucks

If you have any clients who are truck owners, you know how passionate they are about trucks. Not only do they love their pickups, classic truck owners are a special breed. We know, because Classic Auto Insurance has not only written customized specialty insurance policies for classic and collectible trucks for more than 25 years, we’re truck owners and enthusiastic members of the classic truck collector community. We recently finished restoring a 1965 Chevy C10 truck into a shining white restomod, the main restoration of Project C10, Powered by American Modern. No matter what kind of truck your clients own, they likely think of it as part of their family.

Classic truck owners often expect you to have the knowledge and the know-how to hold a spirited dialogue about the history and value of their vehicles, as well. That’s why we’re giving you the backstory on three stand-outs that are proven favorites, especially for the new generation of collectors. The Ford F-100, the Ford Bronco and the Jeep CJ series each have a storied history that has paved the way for the new trucks of today.

The Classic Ford F-100 Series

The legendary Ford F-100 truck has been serving its owners for over 60 years. Ford begins making its F-series in 1953 with the Ford F1, increasing the dimensions, improving the engines and updating the chassis with the second generation. The nomenclature is also updated; the half-ton F1 is renamed F-100, while the F2 and F3 are combined into the three-quarter ton F-250 and the one-ton F4 becomes the F-350. In 1954, the F-100 is given a powerful V-8 engine and in 1957 fans get a brand new design – a more box-like look and a new engine called the “Power King.” By 1959, Ford makes a four-wheel-drive version. Though Ford continues to produce the F-100 through the 1970’s, the F-150 gradually replaces it as the base model. Ford discontinues the four-wheel-drive F-100 in 1978 and in 1984, Ford puts all its energy into the F-150.

The Iconic Ford Bronco

The Bronco has a pedigree even before its release in 1966. It is designed by Donald Frey and Lee Iacocca, who are already known for their iconic work on Ford’s Mustang. They go to work on the Bronco so the Ford Motor Company can compete with Jeep’s CJ. The original Bronco has three body styles – a station wagon, a half-cab and a roadster. The roadster has a sporty and fun design, but ultimately is viewed as impractical. Ford takes it off the market in 1968. The innovative half-cab receives lackluster reviews as a “baby-pickup” and lasts only until 1972. However, the standard model still remains and becomes the Bronco truck fans know and love today. Though the design has evolved over time (and its value has risen over 200% in the last decade), the Bronco has consistently included a rugged chassis and muscled V8 engine. Safety features such as front crumple zones, three-point seatbelts and driver’s side airbags are added on subsequent models, although none have lost the rugged, all-terrain styling of the original.

The Jeep for Regular Folk

The vehicles that are part of the Jeep CJ series aren’t just trucks, they are four-wheel-drive reminders of a storied era of American history. Inspired by the famous Willys military jeeps used by the likes of General George Patton and Dwight Eisenhower during World War II, these civilian jeeps – “CJ” for short – are the world’s first mass-produced four-wheel-drive vehicles designed for the public to drive. Widely regarded as America’s workhorse vehicle, all Jeeps in the CJ series consistently have a separate body and frame, rigid live axles with front and rear leaf springs and a tapering nose design with flared fenders and a fold-flat windshield. It can also be driven without the doors attached. In 1956, the similar DJ Dispatcher is introduced, a two-wheel-drive vehicle available with open, cloth or steel bodies. One of the cool things about the DJ is it accommodates both left and right-handed drives for the hotel, resort, law enforcement and the United States Postal Service markets. After several generations, production of the Jeep CJ comes to an end in 1986. Today’s Jeep Wrangler is inspired by the Jeep CJ-7 while the Jeep Comanche pickup comes from the Jeep CJ-8 and CJ-10 bloodline.

Flexible Mileage Plans & Rollover Miles

Your truck-owner clients will appreciate Classic Auto’s flexible mileage plan options that give you the ability to tailor a policy to their driving habits. If your client owns a garage queen, the 1,000-mile per year plan is perfect. This plan is also great for owners who drive several collector trucks – each can go on its own 1,000-mile plan. Most clients really like the 3,000-mile per year plan, which gives them a lot of flexibility to attend shows, local cruise-ins and other driving experiences. The 6,000-mile per year plan is perfect for owners in warmer climate states that get more than three to four good months of driving. Plus, if your clients’ driving plans change, we offer rollover miles from one year’s policy to the next. It’s a win-win.

The Classic Auto Insurance Difference

As an independent agent, your goal is to find the best protection possible for your collector clients who own classic and muscle trucks. Saving them money strengthens the loyalty they give you and keeps them coming back. In partnership with Classic Auto Insurance, you can offer the coverage and options a collector wants, tailoring policies to fit their needs and doing it for less than what a standard auto policy might cost. Agent partners also enjoy a minimum commission of 10% for every new and renewed policy. To become a referring agent, contact us today.

Learn more about how to fully protect a classic »

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